Use broad strokes to define basic ideas

I usually start my UI layout with blocks of color. The blocks are named in the PSD file so I can tell by browsing what bit performs what function. By keeping it this simple, I don’t get stuck on details that don’t matter right now. I also get a better understanding of flow, shapes and space.

UI_playScreen_1

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